Fossil to be found around the coasts of the Isle of Wight

By February 22, 2019News

In support of the forthcoming 67th Symposium of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy and the 28th meeting of the Symposium of Palaeontological Preparation and Conservation.

To be held on the Isle of Wight from the 10th to the 14th of September 2019.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/SVPCA/


So Id thought you would like to see a small array of fossils from my collection collected from around the Isle of Wight. With contributions kindly given as to their I.D.S from Jack Wonfor and Theo Vickers from the very informative @WightCoastFossils.

Itโ€™s great to know that there are people out there willing to give some of their time up to help understand the fossil fauna around the Isle of Wight.

It is valuable (research) information that is freely given out and makes fossil collecting a lot more worthwhile when trying to understand what you have found and holding in your hand.

And perhaps something that hasnโ€™t been seen or handled a very long time indeed!

The “quoted” descriptions for the fossil photos will be from members of the @WightCoastFossil to the best of their abilities.

If you can take any of the information provided here with you, and proves useful next time you visit the Isle of Wight….then that would be an achievement in itself.

Your truly DW ๐Ÿ™‚


“This fossil photographed at different angles below appears more likely to be a fragment of fish bone as opposed to turtle based on the ‘flaky’ texture and the preservation of the specimen. It’s most probably a bowfin (amiid) as they are the most common large fish found at the site.”  

Possible bowfin (amiid)
Possible bowfin (amiid)
Possible bowfin (amiid)
Possible bowfin (amiid)
Possible bowfin (amiid)

I really like the sturdiness of the Bothriodon sp tooth (pictures below) when held in the hand from the Isle of Wight, Lower Hamstead Beds in Bouldnor, and wanted to know are these indents possible wear facets (indicated by the blue arrow). But before I can really ask that question with confidence, I thought it would be best to ask Theo Vickers from @White Coast Fossils first which end of the tooth the root and which end of the tooth the tip is.

Iโ€™ve quoted Theoโ€™s very informative reply below:


“The tip is where you have the small area of enamel, as visible in the third image down. The area you have highlighted would be at the very base of the root so would be unlikely to be a wear facet. Many vertebrate specimens from the upper Hamstead Member exhibit a fair degree of wear and abrasion from pre-depositional transport on the coastal plain and also have signs of mollusc boring, which may account for the marks you’re seeing on the root.” 

Bothriodon sp tooth
Bothriodon sp tooth
Bothriodon sp tooth showing enamel at the tip
Bothriodon sp tooth showing the root

Various photos of another Bouldnor fossil find below that I found from the Hamstead Beds and described asโ€ฆ

“A relatively uncommon partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).”

partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).
partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).
partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).
partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).
partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).

โ€ฆ.And a smaller partial amiid (bowfin) jaw (photos below) which tend to be very common.

small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
https://www.facebook.com/WightCoastFossils/

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