Stamford and District Geological Society Membership Form

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Apply For Membership Here *

If you would like to visit a working quarry with a geological society (such as the Stamford and District Geological Group), you will have a much higher chance of finding fossils and much better specimens. We always caution members when sites are potentially not suitable for younger children, or where admission for any child is not possible (e.g. a working quarry).

We carry out risk assessments at all locations we visit and clear directions are given to all members as to how to get there. Details will be found on our
website or Facebook page

To comply with the Data Protection Act, the personal information in the above membeship forms will be used by
Stamford & District Geological Society to communicate with members..
It will not be disclosed to third parties and on becoming a member, you agree to your details being held by Stamford & District Geological Society.

Stamford and District Geological Committee Contacts below :

Chairman : Mrs Sandy Ellis

Treasurer and Membership Application : Ms Sheila Martin

Field Secretary : Mr Kenny Nye

You Can Download The Form Below so you can print it off and pop it in the post.

Forthcoming Meetings and Field Trips Below.

https://www.facebook.com/StamfordandDistrictGeologicalSociety/

Fossil to be found around the coasts of the Isle of Wight

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In support of the forthcoming 67th Symposium of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy and the 28th meeting of the Symposium of Palaeontological Preparation and Conservation.

To be held on the Isle of Wight from the 10th to the 14th of September 2019.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/SVPCA/


So Id thought you would like to see a small array of fossils from my collection collected from around the Isle of Wight. With contributions kindly given as to their I.D.S from Jack Wonfor and Theo Vickers from the very informative @WightCoastFossils.

It’s great to know that there are people out there willing to give some of their time up to help understand the fossil fauna around the Isle of Wight.

It is valuable (research) information that is freely given out and makes fossil collecting a lot more worthwhile when trying to understand what you have found and holding in your hand.

And perhaps something that hasn’t been seen or handled a very long time indeed!

The “quoted” descriptions for the fossil photos will be from members of the @WightCoastFossil to the best of their abilities.

If you can take any of the information provided here with you, and proves useful next time you visit the Isle of Wight….then that would be an achievement in itself.

Your truly DW 🙂


“This fossil photographed at different angles below appears more likely to be a fragment of fish bone as opposed to turtle based on the ‘flaky’ texture and the preservation of the specimen. It’s most probably a bowfin (amiid) as they are the most common large fish found at the site.”  

Possible bowfin (amiid)
Possible bowfin (amiid)
Possible bowfin (amiid)
Possible bowfin (amiid)
Possible bowfin (amiid)

I really like the sturdiness of the Bothriodon sp tooth (pictures below) when held in the hand from the Isle of Wight, Lower Hamstead Beds in Bouldnor, and wanted to know are these indents possible wear facets (indicated by the blue arrow). But before I can really ask that question with confidence, I thought it would be best to ask Theo Vickers from @White Coast Fossils first which end of the tooth the root and which end of the tooth the tip is.

I’ve quoted Theo’s very informative reply below:


“The tip is where you have the small area of enamel, as visible in the third image down. The area you have highlighted would be at the very base of the root so would be unlikely to be a wear facet. Many vertebrate specimens from the upper Hamstead Member exhibit a fair degree of wear and abrasion from pre-depositional transport on the coastal plain and also have signs of mollusc boring, which may account for the marks you’re seeing on the root.” 

Bothriodon sp tooth
Bothriodon sp tooth
Bothriodon sp tooth showing enamel at the tip
Bothriodon sp tooth showing the root

Various photos of another Bouldnor fossil find below that I found from the Hamstead Beds and described as…

“A relatively uncommon partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).”

partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).
partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).
partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).
partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).
partial mandible of a large amiid (bowfin).

….And a smaller partial amiid (bowfin) jaw (photos below) which tend to be very common.

small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
small partial amiid (bowfin) jaw
https://www.facebook.com/WightCoastFossils/

An experiment in fossil preparation by Richard Forrest

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For those of you who know Stamford and District Geological Society member Richard Forrest and his canny habit of not to be beaten by the fossil in front of him when it comes to prepping.

Well here is another example of one his tried and tested techniques on the sea urchin a Clypeus ploti. 

Field Secretary Kenny Nye has been very busy over the past couple of months fine tuning the society’s field trip calendar for 2019. With some potential dates pencilled in for Ketton Quarry so perhaps we all can try Richards technique quoted below 😊  

“If like me you collect fossils, you may have been struck by the way in which natural weathering can ‘prepare’ fossils rather better than standard preparation methods. This intrigues me, and has made me wonder if this can be replicated in some way. My best guess is that the natural process is a combination of freeze/thaw cycles and mildly acid washes from rain. So this is my kitchen sink (rather literally!) experiment. I’ve used two echinoids of the genus Clypeus collected from the Blisworth Sandstone from Ketton as test subjects. These fossils are relatively common, and no great loss if the experiment destroys them. Both were partly covered by hard matrix when found. I first soaked the specimen in water made slightly acidic by a slug of vinegar. After leaving it for a couple of hours, I drained away the water and put it in the freezer at a temperature of approximately -20˚C. After a few hours, out of the freezer. To start with I then poured warm water over specimen. After the first few cycles I used boiling water. The initial effect of this was to spall small fragments of matrix off the surface.”

Fig 1: Above is specimen 1 after 4 cycles – dorsal view. Some matrix has come off, but there is a long way to go! At this stage I was scrubbing the echinoid with a toothbrush after it had cooled.


Fig 2: Above is specimen 1 after 4 cycles – ventral view.



Fig 3: Above is specimen 1 after 10 cycles – dorsal view. More of the matrix has come off, but it’s a slow process. I started to use some mechanical assistance at this point, pinging off matrix using a penknife.


Fig 4: Specimen 1 after 14 cycles – dorsal view. Most of the matrix has come off, either by spalling off as the boiling water hits, or by pinging off.
Fig 5: Above is specimen 1 after 18 cycles – dorsal view. The last few cycles made little difference, so this is about as far as the process can go.


Fig 6: Above is specimen 1 after 18 cycles – ventral view.


“The process seemed to work pretty well. I started a second echinoid when part-way through the process making use of what I had learned at the time. The freeze/thaw cycles spall off small fragments of matrix as a the hot water hits the specimen and expose fine surface detail which other methods may not reveal. Larger, hard chunks of matrix are softened and can be scraped off more easily. This is a very limited experiment as only one type of fossil from one Formation was used. Many fossils are affected by water, and obviously cannot be prepared in this way. Fragile specimens may disintegrate under the thermal stresses created. But then, as every experienced preparator knows, each fossil is different, and needs different preparation methods. Specimen 1 has been given to my grandson Otis who was born on the day I found it – you need to start them young! The following images are of the second specimen and show the fine surface detail the process has revealed.”

Fig 7: Above is specimen 2 fully prepared – dorsal view. Some fragments of matrix are still there on the surface, but it is better to stop subjecting the specimen to thermal stress rather than tryng to attain perfection.


Fig 8: Above is specimen 2 detail.


Fig 9: Above is specimen 2 detail.


Fig 10: Above is specimen 2 detail.


“Photographs taken on Olympus TG-4 using integral focus stacking and LED light guide.”

So these are the ‘pound stones’ William Smith was finding in the story of the first geological map – The Map That Changed the World’. It’s a nice little historical footnote for these great specimens.

Thank you Richard for sharing. 

As yet “unknown” fossils from the Bembridge marls on the Isle of Wight.

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I sent some photos of this thought-provoking fossil pictured below I found from the Bembridge marls in Hamstead on the Isle of Wight to Alan Morton. Alan runs the very informative website http://www.dmap.co.uk/fossils/index.htm which has a Collection of Eocene and Oligocene Fossils.

Fossil from the Bembridge marls at Hamstead on the Isle of Wight


Fossil from the Bembridge marls at Hamstead on the Isle of Wight
This is the underneath of the above fossil

 This was his much needed reply quoted below.


“Thanks for sending those images.

I must start by saying that I do not know what these objects are. I come across similar objects frequently whilst sorting through samples of the Bembridge Marls, looking for rare species of mollusc. I put these bony objects aside, hoping that one day I shall be in contact with someone who can shed more light on them. There is one of my specimens of a similar object to yours on the website http://www.dmap.co.uk/fossils/index.htm and pictured below as “Unidentified 3.4mm” placed between the reptile remains and mammal remains in the table of images.


“Unidentified 3.4mm”



I think that the only thing we can really rule out is mammal. You may be right in thinking they are fish, but fish bones are usually rather thin and laminated or ‘flaky’, whereas these objects seem rather more solid, and usually very black, smooth and shiny on their surfaces. I don’t think we can at this stage rule out reptile, or even amphibian. I do wonder whether they might be some sort of dermal bony protective plates of some sort. They don’t look right to me for dental plates.

Anyway, I’d love to know what they are, and I would then put some more examples on the website to help others with their ids, so if you are able to make any further progress with them, do let me know.

Best wishes,

Alan.”

Further and all suggestions are most welcome.

Is this a PLIOSAURUS FEROX?

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A couple of months ago while conducting the pyrite survey with other volunteers at the Peterborough Museum, we found a note in a box of Pliosaur fossils saying about a report on the find in the Peterborough advertiser newspaper and the date 29th of October 1926.

So, with further research from one of the Peterborough volunteers “Ivor Crowson” who is also an honorary member of the Stamford and District Geological Society, went onto finding in the archives at the Peterborough Central Library on Broadway this associated newspaper article. Quoted below, as the quality of the archive including the photograph is as found in the archives.

“Is This a PLIOSAURUS FEROX”

      “THIS CONSIDERABLY-FLATTENED SURIAN lying in the Oxford Clay at Messrs Eastwoods Yardat Fletton, is arousing considerable attention because if it is the PliosaurusFerox- Fierce variety – it is somewhat rare. The inordinate length of the flappers is noteworthy. The head is gone, but probably it is amongst Mr.Phillips collection in the Peterborough Museum, which was secured by the Museum Society. At any rate, if the Eastwood fossil finds a home there, no difficulty will be experienced in completing the beastie. It was originally an inhabitant of the sea, which was over Fletton in its day, millions of years ago. It was probably chocked to death a tremendous flood bringing tons of mud down thechannel, which emptied into the shallow Oxford Clay sea. It may have come toits end fighting with another of its species, but it was covered with mud before it had time to decay and has thus been preserved. We are now making bricks of that mud deposit!”  

I then went onto conduct my own research and established exactly where the Eastwoods Yard brickworks at Fletton 1B(1) indicated in the photo below, used to be in Peterborough in 1926.

Eastwood’s Yard 1b (1) 1926
Fletton brickmaking sites around Peterborough
Key for the Map

The above additional information helps to tell the story of this very important find. And just goes to show with further research for finds such as these by museum volunteers, will always help give provenance when none is available at the time.

IMPORTANT NOTICE TO ALL SDGS MEMBERS

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IMPORTANT NOTICE TO ALL MEMBERS

Booking for Field Trips: Members wishing to attend Field Trips “must” contact Field Secretary Kenny Nye 2 weeks in advance, Kenny prefers to be contacted by text (Mobile number sent via email to members) or email knye@btinternet.com Please ask all and any questions regarding Field Trips to Kenny Nye.
• Please check your membership is up to date before you ask to attend any field trips either with Sheila Martin or Kenny Nye.

For Museum Trips the procedure is the same, but a deposit of £5 must be sent to the Treasurer Sheila Martin at the time of booking you can email Sheila at : sheilamartin@talktalk.net for more information.

PROGRAMME FOR WINTER 2018/19

Please note changes to dates!!

There will only be three meetings as follows with the first all ready being given by Paul Hildreth on the 3rd of October 2018.

Wednesday 5th December 2018 – Members evening with refreshments and a chance for everyone to bring along their finds and hopefully chat about them and encourage others to go fossil hunting.

If anyone wishes to show a few slides just let a committee member know and we will set up the projector.

Wednesday 13th March 2019 – Speaker –Richard Forrest “Excavating a Pliosaur” Richard will discuss this exciting recent important find found by members of the SGDS.

LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU ALL

HAPPY HUNTING!

Best Wishes

Sandy Ellis

(Chairman) email at davsand37@gmail.com

* Visit to the King’s Dyke Nature Reserve fossil area *

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Great News

The SDGS members have a planned visit to the King’s Dyke Nature Reserve Fossil Area. Which will be on the morning of Saturday the 4th August 2018.

For further details please check our events calendar.

Regards,

Kenny Nye (field secretary) for the Stamford and District Geological Society.

p.s. This event would be a great family outing for our younger members.

Here’s a link below giving a fantastic description of the fossil area , courtesy of the https://ukfossils.co.uk website.

King’s Dyke Pit

Stamford and District Geological Society Database

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We are proud to announce a, soon to be released Database for members fossil collections designed by Stamford and District Geological Society member Richard Forrest (website designer for the “The plesiosaur site”) and (database designer for “CBRP Ltd”) .The Database has been crafted to reflect what fossils our members have found in the past. But also builds upon technology capable of addressing future fossil finds.

For further information and If you would like to become involved with this exciting project then head over to the “web editor” email link below and let us know.

Web Editor

 

The sun shone on the Oxford Clay :)

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……The sun shone for the Stamford and District Geological Society today which was an absolute joy to see, especially after the rain we had all day yesterday in Whittlsea. With everyone suitably dressed in the correct attire for getting (covered in clay) and once you mastered the art of what felt like walking on stilts within minutes of trudging around the fossil area.

A great time was had by all….

A big thanks to the following members: Field Secretary Kenny Nye, Richard Forrest creator of the website The Plesiosaur Site and David Savory from the Flag Fen Archaeology Park for their knowledgeable Oxford Clay input, and the new members amongst our group who journeyed out, as days such as these are just not possible without your efforts and contributions.

Special thanks to Philip Parker Associates Ltd for their help in planning for the field trip from start to finish.

Enjoy some of the photos…….

p.s. The society will also donate Belemnite’s they found to the Peterborough Museum for educational purposes.

Gryphaea from the Kellaways clays

From the left indicated by the white arrows : the Teuthida  Acanthoteuthis : crustacea trackways probably made by Mecocheirus : various aragonitic crushed Kosmoceras

Lepidotes fish scale showing peg sockets

Members looking for fossils

The belemnite Cylindroteuthis pusoziana found in some Kellaways clays

pina (pina) mitis bivalves

Members looking for fossils

Members looking for fossils

Members looking for fossils

Members looking for fossils

Members looking for fossils

Members looking for fossils

Members looking for fossils

Members looking for fossils

Unknown fish scale

Members looking for fossils

Unknown at present bone fragment

Members looking for fossils

* Fossils in Matchboxes with Gallery*

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…..One of many match boxes passed onto me by one of the longest serving members of the Stamford and District Geological Society. With the promise of giving the fossils (which are encased inside) some much needed TLC. The majority of these housed match box fossils were collected in the mid-1980s. A brief scribble on the box or a very small moth eaten note is supplied with the contents, with very little other information attached. But for me that’s where the fun begins.

Please enjoy my photo gallery at the bottom of the page….:)

 

As you push the somewhat tatty draws of the match boxes open, a story to research unfolds. I’ve a set of British Palaeozoic, Mesozoic and Caenozoic books and usually more often than not the “World wide Web “ for help to hand, I begin.

First matchbox as you can see (and there are many more to come) these are clearly Brachiopods with a penned clue in the tray of the matchbox “Filey Brigg “but why, when and how have they came to be at present I do not know.

Until now…..That is, I’ve posted a reply in the comment box as an example, as I think I may have found the answer to my question.

Ill post some more hidden gems as and when I can. If you would like to give me a hand in identifying them with posting opinions in the comments box then please let me know.

Note: for reasons you see no associated matchbox with the posted fossil, is because the matchbox will be undergoing extensive repair work. 🙂

UK Fossil Collecting at Filey in Yorkshire

 

Brachiopod

Goniorhynchia boueti

These specimens were found in Langton Herring, Dorset, UK, from the Frome Clay (previously known as Fuller’s Earth).

From the Jurassic period (206 – 144 million years ago)

Period: Jurassic, Great Oolite

 

UK FOSSIL COLLECTING LANGTON HERRING

 

Brachiopod labelled as.

Rhynchonellid species?

Lower Lias

Black Ven Marls

Lyme Regis (West Dorset)

I was wondering if this fossil brachiopod might be Rhynchonelloidella wattonesis but I’m not sure if this has been revised since.

Thank you Mr Leoroyd , as promised 😉

*The SDGS are pleased to announce that we have affiliated to Deposits Magazine and UKGE*

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“The Stamford and District Geological Society are pleased to announce that we have affiliated to Deposits Magazine and UKGE. This brings a great benefit to all members. As members will now receive a free quarterly PDF copy of deposits, packed with superb articles on fossils, rocks and minerals as part of their Membership of the SDGS. With newly signed up members also benefiting from this fantastic offer as part of joining the Stamford and District Geological Society.

More information on the magazine and online back articles can be found at www.depositsmag.com, and geological tools and equipment can be obtained from UKGE, www.ukge.com which now offer free UK shipping on geological equipment.”

deposits

* November 1995 : the 1st edition of the Jurassic Times was published *

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November 1995 the first edition of the Jurassic Times was published.

The Jurassic Times was published by the Stamford and District Geology Society.
Published quarterly in March, June, September and December. Jurassic Times publishes the proceedings of the Society together with articles of a Geological and Paleontological nature and other items of interest to members. Any opinions expressed are those of the individual authors, for which the Society does not accept any responsibility.

* Dr Jeff Liston : Patron : for the Stamford and District Geological Society *

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The Stamford and District Geological Society are truly honoured to have Jeff Liston as patron.

Jeff has had a long and successful career working with the National Museums of Scotland and the University of Bristol, but he pinpoints his eighteen years spent at the Hunterian Museum, during which time he worked as Curator of the Alfred Leeds collection of 650 fossil vertebrates, as when he first encountered the Oxford Clay fossils from around the Peterborough area. This led to his association with John Hudson’s Oxford Clay Working Group, through which he first met Alan Dawn, and guided his choice of PhD to the Middle Jurassic suspension-feeding fish Leedsichthys.

Speaking about why he has agreed to put his name behind our society, Jeff says:
“Considering the global significance of the material found in this area, it is a truly remarkable local resource, yet so few people from the area realise the importance of the animals in the clay that they walk upon. Leicester’s Arthur Cruickshank first introduced me to Alan Dawn and the Oxford Clay collections in Peterborough Museum eighteen years ago. And even then it was clear to me that the fossil material that comes from here even puts grand and revered localities like Lyme Regis into the shade.
I am more than happy to do whatever I can to help promote the work of SDGS to promote the geological heritage of the area, in no small part as a tribute to the memory and legacy of Alan Dawn.”

You can also find many publications penned by Jeff and his colleagues on his page at Academia.edu.

jeff-j-liston-uaslp-24_03_12

* Possible New Field Trip *

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As the Stamford and District Geological Society is always planning ahead in the background to try and bring a variety of locations for next year’s field trip calendar. We now have a possible place to go that requires your attention.

Thanks to the work of the Cambridgeshire Geosites Team, Dr Simon Kelly and the local community, an excavation is now available that provides remarkable access to conglomerates and sandstones of the Early Cretaceous Lower Greensand where it rests against the Jurassic limestone’s of the Jurassic Upware Island.

If you are a member or would like to become a member of the SGDS and would like to go. Then please let me know ASAP.

* Bantycock Opencast quarry field trip 19/09/2015 * report back *

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Hi everyone,

Continuing on with the run of fine weather we are having the SDGS members where blessed with glorious weather for their field trip to Bantycock Opencast quarry. With thirteen members attending it was a fantastic turn out.

I’d just like to thank you all for making the trip well done everyone. I’d also like to thank all those involved in getting this field trip off the ground as it’s no easy feat. And a very big thanks to Andrew Swift for leading us.

And of course to all the staff at Bantycock Opencast quarry for giving up some of their time and exposing a section of Westbury Formation for us, for that we are always very appreciative.
Look forward to next year’s trip.

Regards,

SDGS

And now pleasantries aside here are a few photos that one of our members has sent us of their finds. If you should have any other photos then please don’t hesitate to send them in.

Small caudal ichthyosaur vertebra
small caudal ichthyosaur vertebra

Probably a pliosaur rib section but it seems to have grooves on one side so it could be part of an ichthyosaur mandible. The member who found it keeps changing their mind about which it is!….so any help would be appreciated.
probably a pliosaur rib section or part of an ichthyosaur mandible

part of an ichthyosaur mandible or probably a pliosaur rib section

Plesiosaur rib
plesiosaur rib

A selection of coprolites, most with scaly inclusions.
selection of coprolites most with scaly inclusions

* Hunstanton Field Trip report back *

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A quote from Dr Carl Harrington while organising this year’s field trip to Hunstanton:

“Fingers crossed its third time lucky with Hunstanton. Two years ago it was cancelled because of snow on the ground, I made it in August the next year, but we had the end of a hurricane, so hopefully this year the weather will be nicer.”

Well it was 3rd time lucky indeed as the day was blessed with glorious weather.

Thank you Carl for making this year’s trip to Hunstanton possible and thank you to all SDGS members who made it there…..as you can see from the photos a great day was had by all.

Members looking for fossils

Hunstanton Aug. 2015 001

SDGS Members

Hunstanton Aug. 2015 018

Large Ammonite cast

Hunstanton Aug. 2015 019

Large Ammonite cast

Hunstanton Aug. 2015 020

Colour contrasting cliffs of orange, red and white sedimentary rocks

Hunstanton Aug. 2015 022

SDGS Members

Hunstanton Aug. 2015 024

SDGS Members

Hunstanton Aug. 2015 025

Colour contrasting cliffs of orange, red and white sedimentary rocks

Hunstanton Aug. 2015 027

Large Ammonite cast

mms_img-4317351

Colour contrasting cliffs of orange, red and white sedimentary rocks with Carstone boulders on the foreshore

mms_img-61698521

SDGS Member

mms_img-62091331

Cliffs including Lighthouse

mms_img231049493

Colour contrasting cliffs of orange, red and white sedimentary rocks with Carstone boulders on the foreshore

mms_img659433664

Naturally eroded cavern

mms_img2072642011

If you were there on the day and have any other photos then please send them to me and ill post them here.

Regard’s,

SDGS.

* Winter Lectures Update *

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Lectures will run from October 2015 to March 2016.

 

Mike Lovell Prof. University of Leicester 14 October 2015 lovell

Shale Gas

Ken Rolfe Cambridge Geology Club 11 November 2015 old-river-courses-map

The Fenland Basin and the Fen Edge

Colin Bagshaw East Midlands Geology Society 9 December 2015  Galapagos-Islands-Map

The Galapagos

Naomi Stevenson Natural England 13 January 2016  fdbcf4e1c850df505b19cb7c28e6c1

Crystal Palace – the First Jurassic Park

Richard Forrest SDGS member 10 February 2016 focus_plesiosaur

Plesiosaurs

Dave Ellis SDGS member 09 March 2016 stoneslate-roof-easy-pave

Stone Slates

 

I’d like to thank all those who have previously attended our Winter Lectures at Tinwell Village hall. Lectures are open to members and non-members alike so look forward to seeing you all again.

Regards,

SDGS.

* KINGS DYKE NATURE RESERVE FIELD TRIP IS CANCELLED *

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Dear Members and Non-Members,

Due to not being able to load the fossil area up with fresh clay at the Whittlsea Nature Reserve field trip Sunday the 19th of July .

This would mean the area being very unfossiliferous as the area has not been replenished for many months and has been totally picked over.

So I’ve decided in the interest of our members and for this event to be a more enjoyable experience. I shall arrange another date later in the year.

Sorry for any inconvenience caused.

Kind Regards,

Darren.

* Tilton Railway Cuttings & Browns Hill Quarry 05/07/2015 report back *

By | Field Trip Reports, News | 3 Comments

Tilton Railway Cuttings & Browns Hill Quarry.

A most enjoyable day was had by all involved especially as it’s been a while since the society has visited these two sites. Let’s not leave it so long this time and plan a return for next year.

Here are just a few of our finds and some really pleasant scenery photos.

If you have any photos from the day email them to me and Ill post them here for you.

Thank you Keith for showing us around and sharing some of your fruits from your garden….perfect.

p.s. I have not had the time as yet to establish what species the Ammonites are ….all suggestions welcome.

Members at browns hill quarry

Browns Hill Quarry 001

Ammonite

Ammonite 1a

Ammonite

Ammonite 2a

Ammonite

Ammonite 3a

Ammonite

Ammonite 4a

Ammonite

Ammonite 5a

Ammonite fragments

Ammonite fragments

Ammonites from bedding plane

Ammonites from bedding plane

Browns Hill quarry

Belemnites at browns hill quarry 1

Belemnites at Browns Hill quarry in situ

belemnites at browns hill quarry

Crushed ammonites in situ

crushed ammonites in situ 1

Crushed ammonites in situ

crushed ammonites in situ

lobothyris punctata

lobothyris punctata 1a

lobothyris punctata

lobothyris punctata 1b

Members at browns hill quarry

members at browns hill quarry

Members searching for ammonites

members searching for ammonites 1

Members searching for ammonites

members searching for ammonites

Paper thin crushed ammonite

paper thin crushed ammonite

Partial ammonite

partial ammonite 1

Partial ammonite

partial ammonite 2

Partial ammonite

partial ammonite

Partial ammonites

partial ammonites

Tilton Railway Cutting

Tilton Railway Cuttings 1

Tilton Railway Cutting

Tilton Railway Cuttings 2

Tilton Railway Cutting

Tilton Railway Cuttings 3

Tilton Railway Cutting

Tilton Railway Cuttings 4

Members searching for ammonites

Browns Hill Quarry 006

Members searching for ammonites

Browns Hill Quarry 010

Members searching for ammonites

Browns Hill Quarry 012

Regards,

SDGS.

* You can now apply for membership on the day *

By | Coming Events, News | No Comments

If you should ever happen to miss any of our advertised FIELD TRIPS, and it becomes too late to sign up for membership which is needed in order for you to come along. Then you needn’t worry too much, as you can now sign up for membership on the day of the event.

One of our field trip leaders will have membership forms and membership cards to hand, for you to fill in all the required details needed, enabling you to pay for the annual subscription membership and become a member of the Stamford and District Geological Society there and then.

Look forward to seeing you.

SDGS.

* Ketton Quarry report *

By | Field Trip Reports, News | 3 Comments

A fine day for fresh air, humour and of course fossils.

Quick note to me or for other field trip leaders to Ketton Quarry: “Whatever the weather is at the time past or present be prepared to encounter the 50 meter quagmire stretch that wellies would be more suitable before you hit some dry land.”

“I keep saying I’ll write this in my field notes for future trips but always forget .I wasn’t going to mention this minor annoyance but it’s something we all chuckle about on our way into and out of the site.”

After you have tippy toed the squelches…..you are presented with one of the largest spoil piles that you are probably ever likely to encounter. Where upon you need to start planning to yourself “how am I going to tackle this and where do I start”. Which is part of the fun especially for the new members amongst us, but they needn’t worry as there is always knowledgeable seasoned members especially for this particular site to pass on any information needed and to answer as many questions as possible.

….The gusts of wind felt relatively calm as they brushed your legs while you pondered on what to do as the spoil becomes more apparent. But for those in the know and prepared to tackle this mini mountain those wisps of wind below can be gale force gusts on the top and believe they were.

Your options are plentiful to look for fossils: either scour the outskirts of the said mini mountain for fossils that have weathered out and tumbled down, or traverse the only so slightly steep sides to which you can achieve some fine results or get to the top. If you should manage the hike to the top, which most of our members did then the view is breath taking (literally). In In geology and earth science, a plateau also called a high plain or tableland and I think that’s a very appropriate description for this square stretch of land at the top of the spoil pile. It’s very weathered and abundant in fossils shells, corals, echinoids, and sharks’ teeth can all be found here.

You really can immerse yourself in your own little world at Ketton Quarry due to the vastness of the quarry as you forage around. And all our members came home with a variety of fossils which was very pleasing to see indeed.
It was great to see so many members at this event and look forward to seeing you all here again next year…….” Must remember my stretch of mud notes “

Thank you to Kenny and Bill for making this day possible and to all the staff at Ketton Quarry.

P.S. if you have any photos you would like to see added to this report back (I’ve already started to add some of mine ( prepped, in-situ fossil photos and scenery shots at the bottom of this page) then please could you e-mail them to me. Also if you would like to add your own comments about the day all you need to do is login. If you don’t have any login details then just ask me and I can set this up for you.

It really is simple.

Regards,

Darren.

Acrosalenia hemicidaroides

“Acrosalenia hemicidaroides”

Asteracanthus magnus tooth

“Asteracanthus magnus tooth”

Asteracanthus tenius tooth in situ

“Asteracanthus tenius tooth in situ”

Asteracanthus tenius tooth

“Asteracanthus tenius tooth”

echinoid Clypeus ploti bottom view 1b

“echinoid Clypeus ploti bottom view 1b”

echinoid Clypeus ploti bottom view 3b

“echinoid Clypeus ploti bottom view 3b”

echinoid Clypeus ploti bottom view 3c

“echinoid Clypeus ploti bottom view 3c”

echinoid Clypeus ploti close up view 1c

“echinoid Clypeus ploti close up view 1c”

echinoid Clypeus ploti close up view 2c

“echinoid Clypeus ploti close up view 2c”

echinoid Clypeus ploti in situ 1

“echinoid Clypeus ploti in situ 1”

echinoid Clypeus ploti in situ 2

“echinoid Clypeus ploti in situ 2”

echinoid Clypeus ploti top view 1a

“echinoid Clypeus ploti top view 1a”

echinoid Clypeus ploti top view 3a

“echinoid Clypeus ploti top view 3a”

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

“Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ”

Eomesodon trigonus tooth

“Eomesodon trigonus tooth”

quarry view 1

“quarry view 1”

quarry view 2

“quarry view 2”

width="500"

“quarry view 3”

rootlets in grantham formation 1

“rootlets in grantham formation 1”

rootlets in grantham formation 2

“rootlets in grantham formation 2”

echinoid Clypeus ploti bottom view 2b

“echinoid Clypeus ploti bottom view 2b”

echinoid Clypeus ploti top view 2a

“echinoid Clypeus ploti top view 2a”

*Ketton Quarry next Saturday*

By | News | One Comment

Just some of the fossils we hope to encounter on next Saturdays field trip to Ketton Quarry. I found these on a previous field trip there…..and many more.

Regards,

Darren.

p.s. If any members should have any other photos of fossils from Ketton Quarry please e-mail them to me and ill post them here for others to view.

Eomesodon fish teeth (1)

Eomesodon fish teeth (2)

Eomesodon fish teeth (3)

Eomesodon fish teeth (4)

ketton quarry find 1

ketton quarry find 2

ketton quarry find 3

ketton quarry find 4

ketton quarry find 5

ketton quarry find 6

ketton quarry find 7

ketton quarry find 8

ketton quarry find 9

ketton quarry find 10

ketton quarry find 11

ketton quarry find 12

ketton quarry find 13

* SDGS Photo Slides *

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Here is a rare insight into some of the work performed by Alan Dawn and various members of the Stamford and District Geological Society .Depicting some behind the scene photos taken in the old workshop at the Peterborough museum and from various dig sites around Peterborough. They are currently being reproduced from slides with quite a few still yet to do. With permission they have been kindly loaned to the society for us to show on our website.
Hope you enjoy them.
If you should have any other slides that are associated with Alan Dawn and the Stamford and District Geological Society. Then I’m more than willing to convert them into photos for our website for all to see and admire.

See Link Below :

SDGS PHOTOS

* Our Dear friend Dean Lomax hits the headlines. *

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BBC News: Forgotten fossil found to be new species of ichthyosaur‏.

Our Dear friend Dean Lomax hits the headlines.

Palaeontologist Dean Lomax explains how what had been believed to be a plaster cast turned out to be a new species of ancient marine reptile. A fossil stored in a Doncaster museum for 30 years and thought to be a plaster copy has turned out to be a new species of ancient reptile. A young palaeontologist working with the University of Manchester found the fossil in 2008, in the collections of Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery. He realised it was the 189-million-year-old remains of an ichthyosaur – an extinct marine reptile. Further study confirmed it to be a previously unknown species. The finding has now been published in the Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology.

 

Dean Lomax, the 25-year-old palaeontologist who studied the specimen, said it was so well preserved he could determine the contents of its stomach.

“We could see tiny hook-shaped features that were actually the hooks from the tentacles of squid,” he said. “So we know what its last meal was.”

Mr Lomax worked with Prof Judy Massare, from the State University of New York, comparing the specimen’s fossilised bones with those of almost 1,000 other ichthyosaurs in museums in the US and Europe. Mr Lomax explained that subtle anatomical features in its fin bones set the species apart from others.

Jurassic find

It is not uncommon to find ichthyosaur fossils in England. The sharp-toothed marine reptiles swam in large numbers in the seas around Britain when the dinosaurs roamed. This particular specimen was found in the rocks of Dorset’s Jurassic Coast in the early 1980s and brought to the museum, so it is not clear how it was eventually mistaken for a copied Silvia Danise from Plymouth University said its “rediscovery” was a “striking example of how important museum collections are for scientific research”.

“Collections are treasures that show their value each time we’re able to look at them with a different perspective, and by asking new scientific questions,” she told BBC News.

Dr Blanca Huertas, from the Natural History Museum in London, pointed out that there were still many species to discover in museum collections.

“Sometimes we discover things in the field,” she said, “but the collections are an incredible source of opportunities, since visiting them, people can study specimens and collections from hundreds of places across the entire planet and travel in time.”

Ichthyosaurs

Often misidentified as “swimming dinosaurs”, they first appeared in the early Triassic period (251 million to 199 million years ago) the name means fish-lizard, although the creature has been classified as a reptile since the mid-19th Century. Its length ranged from 1m to 14m – although the average length was 2m to 3m (the Doncaster fossil is 1.5m) the creature was noted for its sharp, robust teeth. Ichthyosaurs became extinct before the dinosaurs, dying out in the early part of the late Cretaceous period (145.5 million to 65.5 million years ago)

Source: Encyclopaedia of Palaeontology.

This new species has now been named Ichthyosaurus anningae – in honour of Mary Anning, the British fossil-hunter who discovered the first ichthyosaur on the Dorset coast in about 1811.

The hope now is that news about the significance of this ancient specimen might help track down the fossil hunter who found it.

Dr Stephen Brusatte, a palaeontologist from the University of Edinburgh added that there was “a whole lot more still to find out there”.

He told BBC News: “Palaeontology is a unique science because you don’t need an advanced degree or specialised training to find a fossil, just patience and a keen set of eyes.”

Mary Anning

The new species has been named after 19th Century palaeontologist Mary Anning.

 

* Quarry Personal Protective Equipment regulations for Next Years Field Trips *

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When entering working quarries and due to new strict guide lines regarding PPE (Personal Protective Equipment). Field trip organisers will advise to all members attending the field trip beforehand on appropriate clothing and footwear for the locality, time of year and as recommended Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Failure by participants to wear recommended clothing and equipment may lead to their exclusion from the meeting. The Stamford and District Geological Society does not automatically provide personal protective equipment.

*Much Wenlock Field Trip Report*

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Here’s a quick group shot of the party before we entered the quarry. I’ve plenty more photos to show everyone as soon as I can.

group shot

Again our group of individuals set of from various parts of the country driving through some heavy persistent rain. With the mind set at (you’re going to get wet on arrival) we all safely arrived at the agreed meeting point.

Where upon arrival we met the husband and quarry owner of our contact Katy Bickerton. He gave us a brief description of the surrounding area about what to expect and where to go…a very nice chap who couldn’t be more helpful.

Katy arrived not long after us around 10.15am we had a discussion about the dos and don’ts and the all-important Health and Safety matters. After that we pretty much had free reign of the quarry where Katy left us to our own devices.

With the all-important trust instilled between both parties we made our way down through an under pass which I think was called from memory (Gorge Tunnel) into the quarry itself.

I forgot to mention the weather was quite sunny after an hour of being there which really bought the best out of everyone and making another fantastic field trip.

We shall most defiantly be back next year.

Here are some scenic photos and some of the fossils semi prepped and in situ that I collected ….don’t forget to add yours when you can.Ive I.D. them the best I can.

Cheers….Darren.

p.s. Thank you Andrew from Shropshire for helping us get our eyes trained into those Trilobites.

Cricoconarida

crinoid head

crinoid head 1

crinoid head 3

Euomphalopterus alatus

fovasitella interpuncta

ketophyllum subturbinatum

limestone plate

Strophomenida

trilobite

unknown coral 4

unknown coral

Unknown corals

unknown coral 14

unknown coral 14

unknown coral 15

unknown coral 16

unknown coral 17

unknown coral 18

Atrypa reticularis 1

Atrypa reticularis 2

Atrypa reticularis 3

Atrypa reticularis 4

Atrypa reticularis 5

Atrypa reticularis 6

Atrypa reticularis 7

Atrypa reticularis 8

Atrypa reticularis 9

Atrypa reticularis 10

Atrypa reticularis 11

Atrypa reticularis 12

Atrypa reticularis 13

Atrypa reticularis 14

bivalves

coral 1

coral 2

coral

Cricoconarida 1a

crinoid head 1b

crinoid head 2c

Dawsonoceras annulatum

entrance to quarry

Favosites goathlandicus 1a

Favosites goathlandicus 1b

Favosites goathlandicus 1c

heliolites interstinctus anterior view

heliolites interstinctus posterior view

Ketophyllum subturbinatum 1a

Ketophyllum subturbinatum 1b

limestone nodule

limestone plate 1

limestone plate 2 showing Strophomenida

limestone plate 3

maby Rhynchonellidea 1a

maby Rhynchonellidea 1b

maby Rhynchonellidea 2a

maby Rhynchonellidea 2b

maby Rhynchonellidea 3a

maby Rhynchonellidea 3b

maby Spiriferida 1a

maby Spiriferida 1b

path leading to entrance

Poleumita discorus

south quarry 1

south quarry

Strophomenida 2

Strophomenida 3

trilobite 1

Trilobites in limestone

tunnel gorge

unknown coral 6a

unknown coral 6b

unknown coral 7a

unknown coral 11

unknown coral 12

unknown coral 13a anterior view

unknown coral 15a anterior view

unknown coral 16a anterior view

unknown coral 17a anterior view

unknown coral 18a anterior view

unknown coral 19a

Here is a half-prepped trilobite found by “one of our eagled eyed SDGS members “it may be an Acaste downingiae or Acastocephala macrops but until it’s cleaned it we won’t be absolutely sure.

semi-prepped Trilobite

And here some other Trilobites found by the same person that are also a work in progress.

semi-prepped Trilobite 1

semi-prepped Trilobite 2

semi-prepped Trilobite 3

Here’s some more photos kindly sent in from another SDGS member who attended the day.

1

2

3

4

5

6

* Dinosaurs of the British Isles Winter Talk Review *

By | News | One Comment

I think it was a real treat for the society to have had a palaeontologist such as Dean Lomax to visit us and to talk about Dinosaurs of the British Isles. Without the publication of his NEW BOOK you just couldn’t comprehend the diversity of Dinosauria roaming our shores…

Barely a week seems to go by without the announcement of some new dinosaur discovery. We seem to have become accustomed to media reports highlighting some exciting aspect of the Dinosauria, often from faraway places and remote parts of the world. Whilst it is always intriguing to hear reports of fossil finds relating to prehistoric animals that once lived in the Arctic Circle or indeed, to see pictures of the newest type of feathered dinosaur identified from north-eastern China, it is worth remembering that dinosaurs, lots of them for that matter, once roamed the British Isles.

To hear about meat-eating dinosaurs from Swindon, Stegosaurs from Peterborough and Tyrannosaurs from the Isle of Wight left you gobsmacked.

Ive also heard on the grapevine that Dean might be working on another new publication about Marine Reptiles…..let’s hope we can get him booked in for next year..!

Regards,

Darren.

“Oh yes and there was the rather embarrassing scenario on my part moment, when Dean incorporated into his PowerPoint presentation and showed everyone my Theropods footprint I found at Saltwick Bay “…Ha Ha.

*Winter Talks Program Complete…dont forget to write the dates in your Diary*

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…So there we have it folks our Winter Lecture Program at Tinwell Village Hall is now fully booked. Id just like to say thank you to the committee for putting everything into place…well done.

Look forward to seeing all those who attend.

 

Tinwell Village Hall

TINWELL VILLAGE HALL

Address

Manor Lane
Tinwell
Stamford
Licolnshire
PE9 3UD

Main Contact

Mr Dave Oregan

Telephone: 01780 756 341
Contactable: 4.30pm – 7.30pm


Facilities

Facilities offered by Tinwell Village Hall are as follows:

Halls & Meeting Rooms

Room Seating Charges
Main Hall 100

Room Facilities

Facility Availability
Electrical Power Points YES
Central Heating YES

Indoor Facilities

  • Easy Interior Access
  • 2 Toilets

Outdoor Facilities

  • Easy Exterior Access
  • Big Car Park

Announced in the Jurassic Times December edition 1995 *Rigs site opens at Ketton*

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I thought you would like to read a paragraph from the first edition of the Stamford and District Geological Societies (Jurassic Times editions) titled…* Rig site opens at Ketton *

 

In relation to the Photo Of The Week which was one of many finds found on the 18th of May 2013 on an organised field trip to Ketton Quarry.

The Newsletter of the Stamford and District Geology Society.

December 1995.

RIG site opens at Ketton.

Saturday, September 16th 1995 saw the culmination of more than a year’s work for the Society’ with the opening of the RIG site at Ketton [GR SK978053] by the Bishop of Grantham, the Rt Rev William ind.
A RIG or Regionally Important Geological Site, is an exposure that is important to the understanding of the geology of a particular area. The site at Ketton shows exposures of the Blisworth Limestone Rutland Formation Lincolnshire Limestone.These Middle Jurassic rocks are cut by a fault in the main face. The fault is part of a system of faults caused by valley cambering. At the top of the fault there is evidence of cryoturbation. A second fault runs through the site as is shown by the two exposures of Blisworth Limestone being at different elevations.

The RIG site is in a disused quarry. The society members had to clear the accumulated undergrowth before any further work could proceed. Steps were cut to enable visitors to see the exposures at close quarters. Paths were laid to link the main exposures and hand rails were provided for the steeper parts. A car park and access ramp down to the site completed the work. In recognition of the work the Society has performed in creating this site a certificate lias been awarded by English Nature.

Regards,

Darren.

Apply For Membership Here And Join Us On Our Field Trips..

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If you would like to visit a working pit with a geological society (such as the Stamford and District Geological Group), you will have a much higher chance of finding fossils and much better specimens.

There will be members of the SDGS at the Dig Deep for Dinos event at Flag Fen in Whittlesea over the August Bank Holiday .If you should have any questions about becoming a member.

You Can View The Membership Form Here…

Then You Can Download The Form Below..

Stamford-Geological-Society-Membership-Application-Form… so you can print it off and pop it in the post.

The Stamford and District Geological Society are now affiliated with the UKGE limited Geological and Microscopy products

By | Coming Events, Educational Resources, Field Trip Reports, News | No Comments

““logo1New website – based on customer feedback

Welcome to our new site, with hundreds of new features.

1 Nov 13

Our previous website has been running 10 years, and served us well during that time. But technology has moved on and so has website design. Our new website uses the latest technology, security and modern day features to bring you, our customers, the very best service we can provide.

Reviews – You can now write or read other peoples product reviews. Customer reviews are becoming an important part of researching before you buy.

Media Rich – From high resolution images, and image galleries, to PDF downloads for user guides and information packs, we try to give you as much information as possible. We are also gradually introducing videos of products.

Customer Login – The customer login experience has changed. New account management, multiple addresses, even EU VAT number checking. Everything has been improved.

Improve Navigation – The entire website navigation experience has changed, making it easier for you to find products. Related products, best selling products, and even “customers who purchased these also purchased…”. These cross-selling links provide the customer with ease of navigation.

Responsive – Our new website has been built with a responsive framework, this means that it will reshape for various devices. Fully compatible with Desktops, Touchscreen Tablets and Smartphones. The site will automatically load in compact mode for small devices.

Wholesale – Our previous website had only a few selected wholesale products, now, we offer wholesale and trade prices on our full range of products. Once approved, the website will display prices correct for your account type meaning you no longer need to contact us for a quote.

Students – Automatic detection of student accounts, means that 10% is added without even needing to apply (*providing a valid “.ac.uk” email is used).

Fast and Secure – Build using the cutting edge of technology and the very latest in security.

These are just a few of the hundreds of improvements you will find! Everything has changed and improved. We have been working on this new site for 18 months.

Jurassic Times: November 1995

By | Jurassic Times, News | No Comments

November 1995 the first edition of the Jurassic Times was published.

The Jurassic Times was published by the Stamford and District Geology Society.
Published quarterly in March, June, September and December. Jurassic Times publishes the proceedings of the Society together with articles of a Geological and Paleontological nature and other items of interest to members. Any opinions expressed are those of the individual authors, for which the Society does not accept any responsibility.

Field Trip To Ketton Quarry on Saturday the 12th of October 2019

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FIELD TRIP TO KETTON QUARY
Saturday October the 12th 2019 | 09:00 am to 3:00 pm

Above are the echinoid, Hemicidaris intermedia found by one of our members on a recent organised field trip to Ketton Quarry. You can view more photos of some additional finds at the bottom of this page.

Ketton Quarry is over a mile wide – its size has to be seen to be believed. The rocks here contain ammonites, corals, brachiopods, bivalves, fish and reptile remains, and much, much more this is a superb location to visit.

This huge quarry presents an opportunity to collect fossils from many different beds (see above). Gypsum is also quite common here. Ketton Quarry also contains one of the most fascinating faults of its kind in the UK and has recently been designated SSSI status.
The quarry is too big to completely cover in one trip. It is huge and is still growing. The best area to search in is the Blisworth Limestone, which is part of the Oolite series. Ammonites can be found, but shells, corals, echinoids, sharks’ teeth and bones are more common. Dinosaur footprints have been seen, along with fragments of their bones.

The quarry shows the finest section of Bajocian (Jurassic ~175mya) to Bathonian (Jurassic ~165mya) strata currently available in inland Britain. Current and temporary exposures have allowed the whole of the Great and Inferior Oolite (Aalenian to Bathonian), and the Kellaways Beds (Callovian) to be seen and the strata are nearly horizontal.
The lower quarry exposes the Lincoln Limestone Formation (Bajocian), while the floor of the upper quarry is formed by the top of this formation. The upper quarry is in the Rutland Formation. At the very top of the exposures is the base of the Oxford Clay, meaning that the entire of the Middle Jurassic can be seen at Ketton Quarry. (Note that recently, a sump hole in the middle of the quarry has revealed Upper Lias mudstones and more.)

Directions : ♦ You need to head towards the geological trail at Top Grange Quarry (see our guide to this site). From the main road from Stamford through Ketton (A6121), go past the large Castle Cement Works, which is the main entrance to the quarry.
♦ Turn into the Ketton Business Park road and follow it all the way down, where you will see a small car park on the left, and the geological trail. There is an entrance to the quarry just past the start of the geological trail. This is a working quarry, so you will need permission to enter.

Field trip organisers will advise to all members attending the field trip beforehand on appropriate clothing and footwear for the locality, time of year and as recommended Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Failure by participants to wear recommended clothing and equipment may lead to their exclusion from the meeting. The Stamford and District Geological Society does not automatically provide personal protective equipment.

Mandatory Equipment: Eye protection, Hard Hats, boots or wellies suitable for quarries, Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Equipment: Generally a geologist’s pick, trowel, chisels and spade. There is plenty of smaller fossil material, so a magnifier or loupe comes in handy and, as much of the material is quite fragile, bring tissue, tape and bags. A packed lunch, Sun protection is advisable if it is a hot day, plus sufficient drink.

For those who are NOT members of the Stamford and District Geological Society. And wish to go on this particular Field Trip or any of our Field Trips and “Exclusive” member’s only Field Trips.

Then please apply for membership below.

*Important note : If you wish to leave early from the site, then please let one of the field trip leaders know before you do so*

“Members are reminded that they cannot take part in field trips without an up-to-date membership card.
This is a requirement under our third party insurance cover. Note that this does not cover members personally and they are responsible for their own safety.”

Please note that entrance to this Working Quarry is Strictly Prohibited unless in association with a Geological Society such as the SDGS or other.

With all field events if you haven’t done so already please will Members. Let our Field Secretary Kenny Nye know at least 10 days in advance so we can cater for numbers this will be the ONLY WAY you will get registered as wishing to attend.

This field trip can usually cater for 15 persons but maby a few more if demand is high.

DISCLAIMER:
Members should appreciate that they are responsible for their own safety.
The society’s insurance is against 3rd parties.

The SDGS has the right to cancel or reschedule a field trip with as much notice as possible. In the unlikely event of cancellation, all registered participants will be notified by email and offered to join alternative field trips. If a fossil hunt is cancelled on the day of the event due to unforeseen circumstances such as extreme weather, SDGS will not be able to accept responsibility for any additional costs or inconvenience resulting from the cancellation.

This weather forecast is generated by the Met Office Weather Widget

You can cancel your place at any point before a fossil hunt, the more notice given the better, if possible.

Additional information about Ketton Quarry at this link provided : Ketton Quarry.

Assessment: All attendees must familiarize themselves with the Risk Assessment below.

PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND READ THE RISK ASSESSMENT FORM HERE

 

Asteracanthus magnus tooth in situ

Asteracanthus magnus tooth in situ

Asteracanthus magnus tooth in situ

Eomesodon sp tooth

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Clypeus echinoid in situ

 

* Field Trip to Hunstanton *

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The Stamford and District Geological Society always keep in contact with good friend and long term society member Dr Carl Harrington. As year on year Carl offers his services in leading a field trip around the sedimentary rocks of Hunstanton.

Im sure many of you will have seen the spectacular white, red and brown cliffs that the coast at Hunstanton is famous for. This field trip will give you an opportunity to discover more about the Cretaceous age material and fossils making up the cliff at Hunstanton cliff which were laid down between 70 and 125 million years ago under a sea. You will also get the opportunity to collect fossils enclosed in the rock, most common of which are shells (bivalves and brachiopods), belemnites, sponges, crustacean burrows and maybe an ammonite or shark tooth.

For a full comprehensive description on how to be prepared for a visit to this location please refer to the Hunstanton link in red below. This was written by our affiliate and geological and expedition specialists UKGE from the very informative ukfossils.co.uk website.

HUNSTANTON

Although Hunstanton is suitable for families, children should stay clear of the cliff face. This location is famous for its sandy beach, which makes it ideal for families.
A packed lunch, Sun protection is advisable if it is a hot day, plus sufficient drink.

” We shall meet at our usual place the Old Light House Car park.”

For those who are NOT members of the Stamford and District Geological Society. And wish to go on this particular Field Trip or any of our Field Trips and “Exclusive” member’s only Field Trips.

Then please apply for membership below.

*Important note : If you wish to leave early from the site, then please let one of the field trip leaders know before you do so*

“Members are reminded that they cannot take part in field trips without an up-to-date membership card. If you are unsure of this then please contact our Treasurer ( Sheila Martin ) via email at : sheilafmartin@talktalk.net

This is a requirement under our third party insurance cover. Note that this does not cover members personally and they are responsible for their own safety.”
With all field events if you haven’t done so already please will Members. Let our Field Secretary Kenny Nye know at least 10 days in advance so we can cater for numbers this will be the ONLY WAY you will get registered as wishing to attend.

This field trip can usually cater for 20 persons but maby a few more if demand is high.

DISCLAIMER:
Members should appreciate that they are responsible for their own safety.
The society’s insurance is against 3rd parties.

The SDGS has the right to cancel or reschedule a field trip with as much notice as possible. In the unlikely event of cancellation, all registered participants will be notified by email and offered to join alternative field trips. If a fossil hunt is cancelled on the day of the event due to unforeseen circumstances such as extreme weather, SDGS will not be able to accept responsibility for any additional costs or inconvenience resulting from the cancellation.
You can cancel your place at any point before a fossil hunt, the more notice given the better, if possible.

Assessment: All attendees must familiarize themselves with the Risk Assessment below.

PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND READ THE RISK ASSESSMENT FORM HERE

Field trip to a Woodhall Spa Quarry on Saturday the 17th of August 2019

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There is a field trip to a quarry in Woodhall Spa on Saturday the 17th of August 2019, the start time will 10.00am and the finish time will be 4.00pm.

Field secretary Kenny Nye has informed the society that he will give directions etc nearer the time of this visit.

If further “confirmed” field trips given to the society from field secretary Kenny Nye come in, then of course we will let members no as soon as possible.

Field trip organisers will advise to all members attending the field trip beforehand on appropriate clothing and footwear for the locality, time of year and as recommended Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Failure by participants to wear recommended clothing and equipment may lead to their exclusion from the meeting. The Stamford and District Geological Society does not automatically provide personal protective equipment.

Mandatory Equipment: Eye protection, Hard Hats, boots or wellies suitable for quarries, Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Equipment: Generally a geologist’s pick, trowel, chisels and spade. We may find smaller fossil material, so a magnifier or loupe comes in handy and, if the the material is quite fragile, bring tissue, tape and bags. A packed lunch, Sun protection is advisable if it is a hot day, plus sufficient drink.

For those who are NOT members of the Stamford and District Geological Society. And wish to go on this particular Field Trip or any of our Field Trips Then please apply for membership below.

*Important note : If you wish to leave early from the site, then please let one of the field trip leaders know before you do so*

“Members are reminded that they cannot take part in field trips without an up-to-date membership card.
This is a requirement under our third party insurance cover. Note that this does not cover members personally and they are responsible for their own safety.”

Please note that entrance to this Working Quarry is Strictly Prohibited unless in association with a Geological Society such as the SDGS or other.

With all field events if you haven’t done so already please will Members. Let our Field Secretary Kenny Nye know at least 10 days in advance so we can cater for numbers this will be the ONLY WAY you will get registered as wishing to attend.

This field trip can usually cater for 15 persons but maby a few more if demand is high.

DISCLAIMER:
Members should appreciate that they are responsible for their own safety.
The society’s insurance is against 3rd parties.

The SDGS has the right to cancel or reschedule a field trip with as much notice as possible. In the unlikely event of cancellation, all registered participants will be notified by email and offered to join alternative field trips. If a fossil hunt is cancelled on the day of the event due to unforeseen circumstances such as extreme weather, SDGS will not be able to accept responsibility for any additional costs or inconvenience resulting from the cancellation.

You can cancel your place at any point before a fossil hunt, the more notice given the better, if possible.

Assessment: All attendees must familiarize themselves with the Risk Assessment below.

PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND READ THE RISK ASSESSMENT FORM HERE

 

Field trip to a Woodhall Spa Quarry on Saturday the 13th of July 2019

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There is a field trip to a quarry in Woodhall Spa on Saturday the 13th of July 2019, the start time will 10.00am and the finish time will be 4.00pm.

Field secretary Kenny Nye has informed the society that he will give directions etc nearer the time of this visit.

If further “confirmed” field trips given to the society from field secretary Kenny Nye come in, then of course we will let members no as soon as possible.

Field trip organisers will advise to all members attending the field trip beforehand on appropriate clothing and footwear for the locality, time of year and as recommended Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Failure by participants to wear recommended clothing and equipment may lead to their exclusion from the meeting. The Stamford and District Geological Society does not automatically provide personal protective equipment.

Mandatory Equipment: Eye protection, Hard Hats, boots or wellies suitable for quarries, Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Equipment: Generally a geologist’s pick, trowel, chisels and spade. We may find smaller fossil material, so a magnifier or loupe comes in handy and, if the the material is quite fragile, bring tissue, tape and bags. A packed lunch, Sun protection is advisable if it is a hot day, plus sufficient drink.

For those who are NOT members of the Stamford and District Geological Society. And wish to go on this particular Field Trip or any of our Field Trips Then please apply for membership below.

*Important note : If you wish to leave early from the site, then please let one of the field trip leaders know before you do so*

“Members are reminded that they cannot take part in field trips without an up-to-date membership card.
This is a requirement under our third party insurance cover. Note that this does not cover members personally and they are responsible for their own safety.”

Please note that entrance to this Working Quarry is Strictly Prohibited unless in association with a Geological Society such as the SDGS or other.

With all field events if you haven’t done so already please will Members. Let our Field Secretary Kenny Nye know at least 10 days in advance so we can cater for numbers this will be the ONLY WAY you will get registered as wishing to attend.

This field trip can usually cater for 15 persons but maby a few more if demand is high.

DISCLAIMER:
Members should appreciate that they are responsible for their own safety.
The society’s insurance is against 3rd parties.

The SDGS has the right to cancel or reschedule a field trip with as much notice as possible. In the unlikely event of cancellation, all registered participants will be notified by email and offered to join alternative field trips. If a fossil hunt is cancelled on the day of the event due to unforeseen circumstances such as extreme weather, SDGS will not be able to accept responsibility for any additional costs or inconvenience resulting from the cancellation.

You can cancel your place at any point before a fossil hunt, the more notice given the better, if possible.

Assessment: All attendees must familiarize themselves with the Risk Assessment below.

PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND READ THE RISK ASSESSMENT FORM HERE

 

Field Trip To Ketton Quarry on Saturday the 6th of April 2019

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FIELD TRIP TO KETTON QUARY
Saturday April the 6th 2019 | 09:00 am to 3:00 pm

Above are the echinoid, Hemicidaris intermedia found by one of our members on a recent organised field trip to Ketton Quarry. You can view more photos of some additional finds at the bottom of this page.

Ketton Quarry is over a mile wide – its size has to be seen to be believed. The rocks here contain ammonites, corals, brachiopods, bivalves, fish and reptile remains, and much, much more this is a superb location to visit.

This huge quarry presents an opportunity to collect fossils from many different beds (see above). Gypsum is also quite common here. Ketton Quarry also contains one of the most fascinating faults of its kind in the UK and has recently been designated SSSI status.
The quarry is too big to completely cover in one trip. It is huge and is still growing. The best area to search in is the Blisworth Limestone, which is part of the Oolite series. Ammonites can be found, but shells, corals, echinoids, sharks’ teeth and bones are more common. Dinosaur footprints have been seen, along with fragments of their bones.

The quarry shows the finest section of Bajocian (Jurassic ~175mya) to Bathonian (Jurassic ~165mya) strata currently available in inland Britain. Current and temporary exposures have allowed the whole of the Great and Inferior Oolite (Aalenian to Bathonian), and the Kellaways Beds (Callovian) to be seen and the strata are nearly horizontal.
The lower quarry exposes the Lincoln Limestone Formation (Bajocian), while the floor of the upper quarry is formed by the top of this formation. The upper quarry is in the Rutland Formation. At the very top of the exposures is the base of the Oxford Clay, meaning that the entire of the Middle Jurassic can be seen at Ketton Quarry. (Note that recently, a sump hole in the middle of the quarry has revealed Upper Lias mudstones and more.)

Directions : ♦ You need to head towards the geological trail at Top Grange Quarry (see our guide to this site). From the main road from Stamford through Ketton (A6121), go past the large Castle Cement Works, which is the main entrance to the quarry.
♦ Turn into the Ketton Business Park road and follow it all the way down, where you will see a small car park on the left, and the geological trail. There is an entrance to the quarry just past the start of the geological trail. This is a working quarry, so you will need permission to enter.

Field trip organisers will advise to all members attending the field trip beforehand on appropriate clothing and footwear for the locality, time of year and as recommended Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Failure by participants to wear recommended clothing and equipment may lead to their exclusion from the meeting. The Stamford and District Geological Society does not automatically provide personal protective equipment.

Mandatory Equipment: Eye protection, Hard Hats, boots or wellies suitable for quarries, Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Equipment: Generally a geologist’s pick, trowel, chisels and spade. There is plenty of smaller fossil material, so a magnifier or loupe comes in handy and, as much of the material is quite fragile, bring tissue, tape and bags. A packed lunch, Sun protection is advisable if it is a hot day, plus sufficient drink.

For those who are NOT members of the Stamford and District Geological Society. And wish to go on this particular Field Trip or any of our Field Trips and “Exclusive” member’s only Field Trips.

Then please apply for membership below.

*Important note : If you wish to leave early from the site, then please let one of the field trip leaders know before you do so*

“Members are reminded that they cannot take part in field trips without an up-to-date membership card.
This is a requirement under our third party insurance cover. Note that this does not cover members personally and they are responsible for their own safety.”

Please note that entrance to this Working Quarry is Strictly Prohibited unless in association with a Geological Society such as the SDGS or other.

With all field events if you haven’t done so already please will Members. Let our Field Secretary Kenny Nye know at least 10 days in advance so we can cater for numbers this will be the ONLY WAY you will get registered as wishing to attend.

This field trip can usually cater for 15 persons but maby a few more if demand is high.

DISCLAIMER:
Members should appreciate that they are responsible for their own safety.
The society’s insurance is against 3rd parties.

The SDGS has the right to cancel or reschedule a field trip with as much notice as possible. In the unlikely event of cancellation, all registered participants will be notified by email and offered to join alternative field trips. If a fossil hunt is cancelled on the day of the event due to unforeseen circumstances such as extreme weather, SDGS will not be able to accept responsibility for any additional costs or inconvenience resulting from the cancellation.

This weather forecast is generated by the Met Office Weather Widget

You can cancel your place at any point before a fossil hunt, the more notice given the better, if possible.

Additional information about Ketton Quarry at this link provided : Ketton Quarry.

Assessment: All attendees must familiarize themselves with the Risk Assessment below.

PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND READ THE RISK ASSESSMENT FORM HERE

 

Asteracanthus magnus tooth in situ

Asteracanthus magnus tooth in situ

Asteracanthus magnus tooth in situ

Eomesodon sp tooth

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Clypeus echinoid in situ

 

Pycnodont fish teeth from Ketton Quarry

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Below and above with scale is a fine example of what I believe to be a partial jaw from an extinct species of pycnodont fish called Eomesodon cf. trigonus or Gyrodus sp found by one of our members on a recent trip to Ketton Quarry.
Our members have found single teeth from this fish from previous visits to Ketton Quarry, but this find is a first for the society as far as I’m aware.

Possible partial jaw of Gyrodus sp. or Eomesodon cf. trigonus above

Below are some comparison examples which are also from the Bathonian stage (Jaws of Gyrodus sp. and Eomesodon cf. trigonus).


Top: Prearticular (splenial) of Gyrodus cuvieri (Natural History Museum, London).
Bottom: Prearticular (splenial) of Eomesodon cf. trigonus (Department of Geology, University of Leicester).

The specimen is now in the hands of society member Richard Forrest going through a rather tricky prepping process.

Field Trip To Ketton Quarry on Saturday the 23rd of March 2019

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FIELD TRIP TO KETTON QUARY
Saturday March the 23rd 2019 | 09:00 am to 3:00 pm

Above are the echinoid, Hemicidaris intermedia found by one of our members on a recent organised field trip to Ketton Quarry. You can view more photos of some additional finds at the bottom of this page.

Ketton Quarry is over a mile wide – its size has to be seen to be believed. The rocks here contain ammonites, corals, brachiopods, bivalves, fish and reptile remains, and much, much more this is a superb location to visit.

This huge quarry presents an opportunity to collect fossils from many different beds (see above). Gypsum is also quite common here. Ketton Quarry also contains one of the most fascinating faults of its kind in the UK and has recently been designated SSSI status.
The quarry is too big to completely cover in one trip. It is huge and is still growing. The best area to search in is the Blisworth Limestone, which is part of the Oolite series. Ammonites can be found, but shells, corals, echinoids, sharks’ teeth and bones are more common. Dinosaur footprints have been seen, along with fragments of their bones.

The quarry shows the finest section of Bajocian (Jurassic ~175mya) to Bathonian (Jurassic ~165mya) strata currently available in inland Britain. Current and temporary exposures have allowed the whole of the Great and Inferior Oolite (Aalenian to Bathonian), and the Kellaways Beds (Callovian) to be seen and the strata are nearly horizontal.
The lower quarry exposes the Lincoln Limestone Formation (Bajocian), while the floor of the upper quarry is formed by the top of this formation. The upper quarry is in the Rutland Formation. At the very top of the exposures is the base of the Oxford Clay, meaning that the entire of the Middle Jurassic can be seen at Ketton Quarry. (Note that recently, a sump hole in the middle of the quarry has revealed Upper Lias mudstones and more.)

Directions : ♦ You need to head towards the geological trail at Top Grange Quarry (see our guide to this site). From the main road from Stamford through Ketton (A6121), go past the large Castle Cement Works, which is the main entrance to the quarry.
♦ Turn into the Ketton Business Park road and follow it all the way down, where you will see a small car park on the left, and the geological trail. There is an entrance to the quarry just past the start of the geological trail. This is a working quarry, so you will need permission to enter.

Field trip organisers will advise to all members attending the field trip beforehand on appropriate clothing and footwear for the locality, time of year and as recommended Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Failure by participants to wear recommended clothing and equipment may lead to their exclusion from the meeting. The Stamford and District Geological Society does not automatically provide personal protective equipment.

Mandatory Equipment: Eye protection, Hard Hats, boots or wellies suitable for quarries, Orange Hi-Vis Vests.

Equipment: Generally a geologist’s pick, trowel, chisels and spade. There is plenty of smaller fossil material, so a magnifier or loupe comes in handy and, as much of the material is quite fragile, bring tissue, tape and bags. A packed lunch, Sun protection is advisable if it is a hot day, plus sufficient drink.

For those who are NOT members of the Stamford and District Geological Society. And wish to go on this particular Field Trip or any of our Field Trips and “Exclusive” member’s only Field Trips.

Then please apply for membership below.

*Important note : If you wish to leave early from the site, then please let one of the field trip leaders know before you do so*

“Members are reminded that they cannot take part in field trips without an up-to-date membership card.
This is a requirement under our third party insurance cover. Note that this does not cover members personally and they are responsible for their own safety.”

Please note that entrance to this Working Quarry is Strictly Prohibited unless in association with a Geological Society such as the SDGS or other.

With all field events if you haven’t done so already please will Members. Let our Field Secretary Kenny Nye know at least 10 days in advance so we can cater for numbers this will be the ONLY WAY you will get registered as wishing to attend.

This field trip can usually cater for 15 persons but maby a few more if demand is high.

DISCLAIMER:
Members should appreciate that they are responsible for their own safety.
The society’s insurance is against 3rd parties.

The SDGS has the right to cancel or reschedule a field trip with as much notice as possible. In the unlikely event of cancellation, all registered participants will be notified by email and offered to join alternative field trips. If a fossil hunt is cancelled on the day of the event due to unforeseen circumstances such as extreme weather, SDGS will not be able to accept responsibility for any additional costs or inconvenience resulting from the cancellation.

This weather forecast is generated by the Met Office Weather Widget

You can cancel your place at any point before a fossil hunt, the more notice given the better, if possible.

Additional information about Ketton Quarry at this link provided : Ketton Quarry.

Assessment: All attendees must familiarize themselves with the Risk Assessment below.

PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND READ THE RISK ASSESSMENT FORM HERE

 

Asteracanthus magnus tooth in situ

Asteracanthus magnus tooth in situ

Asteracanthus magnus tooth in situ

Eomesodon sp tooth

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Eomesodon trigonus tooth in situ

Clypeus echinoid in situ

 

Wednesday 13th March 2019 – Speaker -Richard Forrest “Excavating a Pliosaur”

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Excavating a Pliosaur

Wednesday 13th March 2019 – Speaker -Richard Forrest “Excavating a Pliosaur”

…Richard will discuss this exciting recent important find found by members of the SGDS on a field trip of the Stamford and District Geological Society to a quarry in north Lincolnshire. SDGS member Darren Withers found some bones in the Kimmeridge Clay. They were clearly those of a large pliosaur, the top predator of the Kimmeridge Clay seas and therefore rare. It was clear from the outset this is an important find.
Subsequent visits recovered more bones, and a systematic excavation was undertaken. This exposed many more bones and recorded valuable information on what happened to the carcase of the animal as it lay on the sea floor.

The specimen will be the main focus of a new display planned for North Lincolnshire Museum.

SDGS.

” Note from the editor-who remembers the days of the famous Deeping Elephant ”

 

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