* Tilton Railway Cuttings & Browns Hill Quarry 05/07/2015 report back *

By July 11, 2015Field Trip Reports, News

Tilton Railway Cuttings & Browns Hill Quarry.

A most enjoyable day was had by all involved especially as it’s been a while since the society has visited these two sites. Let’s not leave it so long this time and plan a return for next year.

Here are just a few of our finds and some really pleasant scenery photos.

If you have any photos from the day email them to me and Ill post them here for you.

Thank you Keith for showing us around and sharing some of your fruits from your garden….perfect.

p.s. I have not had the time as yet to establish what species the Ammonites are ….all suggestions welcome.

Members at browns hill quarry

Browns Hill Quarry 001

Ammonite

Ammonite 1a

Ammonite

Ammonite 2a

Ammonite

Ammonite 3a

Ammonite

Ammonite 4a

Ammonite

Ammonite 5a

Ammonite fragments

Ammonite fragments

Ammonites from bedding plane

Ammonites from bedding plane

Browns Hill quarry

Belemnites at browns hill quarry 1

Belemnites at Browns Hill quarry in situ

belemnites at browns hill quarry

Crushed ammonites in situ

crushed ammonites in situ 1

Crushed ammonites in situ

crushed ammonites in situ

lobothyris punctata

lobothyris punctata 1a

lobothyris punctata

lobothyris punctata 1b

Members at browns hill quarry

members at browns hill quarry

Members searching for ammonites

members searching for ammonites 1

Members searching for ammonites

members searching for ammonites

Paper thin crushed ammonite

paper thin crushed ammonite

Partial ammonite

partial ammonite 1

Partial ammonite

partial ammonite 2

Partial ammonite

partial ammonite

Partial ammonites

partial ammonites

Tilton Railway Cutting

Tilton Railway Cuttings 1

Tilton Railway Cutting

Tilton Railway Cuttings 2

Tilton Railway Cutting

Tilton Railway Cuttings 3

Tilton Railway Cutting

Tilton Railway Cuttings 4

Members searching for ammonites

Browns Hill Quarry 006

Members searching for ammonites

Browns Hill Quarry 010

Members searching for ammonites

Browns Hill Quarry 012

Regards,

SDGS.

Join the discussion 3 Comments

  • Martin Beever says:

    The forth ammonite down looks like a Tiltoniceras antiquum. It is the zone ammonite for the uppermost layer of the Marlstone and is what the area is famous for. I have four examples myself. The rest apart from the top two (are they Marlstone or Whitby Mudstone) are Dactylioceras sp. and related types from the Whitby Mudstone. The Whitby Mudstone at Tilton goes up to the Falciferum Zone so not as high as the strata in Yorkshire as the Bifrons and succeeding zones are missing at Tilton.
    Hope that helps.
    Martin

    • Darren says:

      Hi Martin,

      It’s good to hear from you and great to read your comment. Your knowledge of British fossils is greatly received and made valuable reading for Mick B and myself. We hope to plan another trip there very soon if you’d like to tag along.

      Regards,

      Darren.

  • Martin Beever says:

    Hi Darren
    I’ll e-mail you some photos of my Tilton ammonites when I can including a very rare one for reference and If I can make it to another trip I will be there. The Tiltoniceras is not used as a zone ammonite nowadays and has been slightly redefined as examples can be found in the Whitby Mudstone Formation in the Tenuicostatum Zone, Semicelatum Subzone. This means if the top of the Marlstone in the Midlands by the presence of this ammonite is of the same zone then it was being laid down at the same time as the early beds of the Whitby Mudstone in Yorkshire. I think this is why the Lias had to be altered and the American formation system had to be brought in as the old system didn’t quite work. It may also show the sea deepened from the north as the old upper Lias progressed with the Dorset sea becoming less deep, equivalent deposits (Bridport Limestone) being of a more shallower sea carbonate nature.
    That’s my theory (I may be wrong).
    Cheers
    Martin

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